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How to Cook a No-Waste Thanksgiving

How to Cook a No-Waste Thanksgiving


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Give thanks this holiday by not tossing scraps

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As you plan your holiday meal, show thanks for the plentiful food in your refrigerator and pantry by planning a meal that minimizes the amount of usable food scraps you toss out.

We’ve read the statistics. Roughly a third of the food produced for consumption is wasted every year. According to the NRDC, the U.S. is holding steady — above the world average — tossing almost 40 percent of food produced each year. That’s a lot of food, especially considering the U.S. is one of the largest producers in the world of staple foods like corn, wheat, and soybeans.

[slideshow:]Before you rush off to the store with your pages long list, take a quick inventory of what you already have. Note that “best by” dates are often a guideline, especially when it comes to canned goods, like that leftover canned pumpkin from last year.

Then, as you plan your menu consider how your dishes will fit together. Maybe you don’t like potato peels in your creamy mashed potatoes that you pathologically run through a ricer to ensure there are absolutely no lumps (we are with you on this one), but perhaps there is a use for those peels in another dish.

Try to get a firm head count. Wrangling RSVPs from guests can feel a lot like herding cattle, but the more certain you are of a number, the better you can plan portions, so you don’t over-shop, and end up with two pounds when one will do.

For the completely unavoidable scraps, consider starting a compost pile in your yard. Don’t have a yard? You can compost in your freezer.

Finally, share your leftovers with others by donating. Or, show your leftovers some love by turning yesterday’s Thanksgiving dinner into tomorrow’s spectacular lunch.

Let your ingredients shine with these waste-free Thanksgiving menu ideas from starters to dessert.

How to Cook a No-Waste Thanksgiving

Thinkstock

As you plan your holiday meal, show thanks for the plentiful food in your refrigerator and pantry by planning a meal that minimizes the amount of usable food scraps you toss out.

We’ve read the statistics. Or, show your leftovers some love by turning yesterday’s Thanksgiving dinner into tomorrow’s spectacular lunch.

Let your ingredients shine with these waste-free Thanksgiving menu ideas from starters to dessert.

No-Waste Appetizers

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When planning your menu, think of appetizers that will coordinate with the rest of the meal and how you can repurpose food waste for other dishes or leftovers. Keep appetizers simple, so as not to stuff your guests before the meal. You will only need one or two things to snack on depending upon the size of your party.

Chicken Liver Mousse

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We save the chicken livers in the freezer every time we roast a chicken just for this special, rich, and decadent Chicken Liver Mousse treat, but that’s just us. If you need to buy them, your local butcher can help you out. Serve this mousse on crust-less toast points, and save the crusts for an easy, breakfast French Toast Strata.

Gravlax

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This refreshing Gravlax appetizer is lightly cured. Make it at least two days in advance to develop the best flavor. Then, save the salmon skin for Crispy Salmon Skin Fritters that you can serve alongside dinner.

No-Waste Sides

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Thanksgiving sides can get pretty out of hand, especially if Aunt Sue will be crushed if you don’t serve sweet potato casserole, but everyone else waits all year for creamy mashed potatoes, when you know you also need to make stuffing. Check out our picks for three side dishes — roasted vegetables, potatoes, and stuffing included — that minimize your food waste.

Roasted Radishes

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We love the Slow-Roasted Radishes for fall, and of course, you can throw some carrots in there, too. The subtle spicy end notes of the radishes are mellowed by a hint of caramelized maple syrup. Don’t toss the radish tops, save those for this simple Radish Top Soup, or use the tender greens for a Whole Leaf Radish and Herb Salad.

Stuffing

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When looking through your pantry before the holidays, account for any bread you might have. Stale bread is perfect for stuffing because the bread works like a sponge absorbing the turkey or chicken stock. Check out this recipe for a classic Brioche Stuffing. Save any crusts or crumbs for a Peanut Butter and Jelly Bread Pudding.

No-Waste Main Course

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There is so much you can do with your Thanksgiving turkey beyond the actual main course. Don’t let any of your holiday bird go to waste with these ideas that will keep you cooking straight through the holidays.

Thanksgiving Turkey

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We can’t get enough of this butterflied Brined and Smoked Thanksgiving Turkey recipe. It takes less time to cook than a traditional stuffed turkey and by cooking the legs separate from the breasts, you ensure that each cut is cooked perfectly without becoming dry.

Save the giblets for a rich and delicious Giblet Gravy to serve alongside your Thanksgiving turkey, but you aren’t done just yet. Once you have carved all you can eat from your bird, save the leftovers and use the bones to make a flavorful Turkey Stock along with any leftover herbs or vegetables.

No-Waste Dessert

For the final course, continue your no-waste theme by either amending your recipes to incorporate your usual waste or by saving the scraps from your fall fruit to repurpose in other recipes.

Apple Crostata

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Serve crostata instead of a traditional pie, and leave the apple skins on this time. Vegetable and fruit skins are extremely healthy, so you can feel good about serving something with some nutritional value. Plus, these apples are cooked down to a soft stew, so the skins won’t be chewy. To test out this simple dessert try this recipe for an Apple Crostata with an Oat Crumble Topping, and remember to save any leftover oats from the topping for a healthy oatmeal breakfast.

Slow-Cooker Cranberry Orange Cake

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Looking for a simple sweat-free way to contribute to this year’s Thanksgiving table? Check-out this simple recipe for a Slow-Cooker Cranberry Orange Cake. Then, save the orange peels for a fall cocktail to serve after Thanksgiving dinner like this Smoked Maple Old Fashioned.


No-Waste and Leftovers Cookbooks: The Best Books to Reduce Food Waste

Hate seeing food go to waste? It’s one thing obsessing about those containers full of yesterday’s dinner and quite another working out how to avoid creating waste in the first place. These are five of the best zero-waste cookbooks, from repurposing leftovers to using every part of the animal or vegetable.

Now & Again: Go-To Recipes, Inspired Menus + Endless Ideas for Reinventing Leftovers by Julia Turshen

Chef, activist and occasional Gwyneth Paltrow collaborator, Julia Turshen, will completely revolutionise the way you think about cooking with this 2018 book. Yes, cooking with leftovers in mind is a huge part of it but, thankfully, the focus here is on entertaining first.

Turshen’s simple, seasonal and affordable recipes – from the 'No Stress Thanksgiving' dinner to mouthwatering salads and sides – all come with tips on preparing ahead of time, answering handy questions like what to serve the dish with and how to figure out exactly how much you need. The latter isn’t a perfect science, of course, so you’ll also find tips on how to repurpose any leftovers you do have.

Cooking With Scraps: Turn Your Peels, Cores, Rinds, and Stems into Delicious Meals by Lindsay-Jean Hard

Lindsay-Jean Hard writes the Cooking With Scraps column for Food52 and this book compiles 85 of her best zero-waste recipes.

As well as a few easy ideas on how to use broccoli stems and stale bread, Hard also shares intriguing recipes like carrot green pesto and vegan mayonnaise made from leftover bean water. Weird, but after trying a few you’ll wonder why you were ever throwing these things out in the first place.

Scraps, Peels, and Stems: Recipes and Tips for Rethinking Food Waste at Home by Jill Lightner

On the surface, Scraps, Peels, and Stems isn’t much different to Cooking With Scraps above. But if there’s one criticism of the latter, it’s that too many of the recipes require buying other ingredients to make them work. Jill Lightner’s book, on the other hand, is less strict with its recipes.

Instead, Scraps, Peels, and Stems offers inspiration for coming up with your own ideas. Sure, you can just follow the instructions if you’d prefer, but this is a great buy for confident homecooks who are eager to use their own creativity in experimenting with those parts of the animal or vegetable that often get thrown away.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook by Linda Ly

Linda Ly writes about farm-to-table cooking on her blog, Garden Betty. The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook was her first book, and it’s now back in a new revised edition.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook is, in Ly’s own words, an “indispensable book for home cooks with adventurous appetites”, and we’re inclined to agree. It’s a superb guide to all the parts of the vegetable you can and can’t eat. If your end goal is to grow more of your own food out in the garden, or even to become entirely self-sufficient, then this is the book for you.

Eat It Up! by Sherri Brooks Vinton

Compared with other books in this list, Eat It Up! is very much aimed at zero-waste newbies. That said, it’s a comprehensive guide for young chefs looking to eat more sustainably, even if older, more experienced cooks might find many of its tips and techniques second nature. It makes a great gift for young adults moving away from home for the first time.

The No Food Waste Movement

About 1.3 billion tons of perfectly edible food is wasted each year. That’s roughly 250 lbs (113 kg) per person – enough to feed someone for up to two months. Cutting down on food waste is something we can all do to feed the world and benefit our environment.

Click here to learn more about what you can do to take part in this important movement and read what others are doing as well. You can even get started today by downloading one of these excellent food waste apps.


No-Waste and Leftovers Cookbooks: The Best Books to Reduce Food Waste

Hate seeing food go to waste? It’s one thing obsessing about those containers full of yesterday’s dinner and quite another working out how to avoid creating waste in the first place. These are five of the best zero-waste cookbooks, from repurposing leftovers to using every part of the animal or vegetable.

Now & Again: Go-To Recipes, Inspired Menus + Endless Ideas for Reinventing Leftovers by Julia Turshen

Chef, activist and occasional Gwyneth Paltrow collaborator, Julia Turshen, will completely revolutionise the way you think about cooking with this 2018 book. Yes, cooking with leftovers in mind is a huge part of it but, thankfully, the focus here is on entertaining first.

Turshen’s simple, seasonal and affordable recipes – from the 'No Stress Thanksgiving' dinner to mouthwatering salads and sides – all come with tips on preparing ahead of time, answering handy questions like what to serve the dish with and how to figure out exactly how much you need. The latter isn’t a perfect science, of course, so you’ll also find tips on how to repurpose any leftovers you do have.

Cooking With Scraps: Turn Your Peels, Cores, Rinds, and Stems into Delicious Meals by Lindsay-Jean Hard

Lindsay-Jean Hard writes the Cooking With Scraps column for Food52 and this book compiles 85 of her best zero-waste recipes.

As well as a few easy ideas on how to use broccoli stems and stale bread, Hard also shares intriguing recipes like carrot green pesto and vegan mayonnaise made from leftover bean water. Weird, but after trying a few you’ll wonder why you were ever throwing these things out in the first place.

Scraps, Peels, and Stems: Recipes and Tips for Rethinking Food Waste at Home by Jill Lightner

On the surface, Scraps, Peels, and Stems isn’t much different to Cooking With Scraps above. But if there’s one criticism of the latter, it’s that too many of the recipes require buying other ingredients to make them work. Jill Lightner’s book, on the other hand, is less strict with its recipes.

Instead, Scraps, Peels, and Stems offers inspiration for coming up with your own ideas. Sure, you can just follow the instructions if you’d prefer, but this is a great buy for confident homecooks who are eager to use their own creativity in experimenting with those parts of the animal or vegetable that often get thrown away.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook by Linda Ly

Linda Ly writes about farm-to-table cooking on her blog, Garden Betty. The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook was her first book, and it’s now back in a new revised edition.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook is, in Ly’s own words, an “indispensable book for home cooks with adventurous appetites”, and we’re inclined to agree. It’s a superb guide to all the parts of the vegetable you can and can’t eat. If your end goal is to grow more of your own food out in the garden, or even to become entirely self-sufficient, then this is the book for you.

Eat It Up! by Sherri Brooks Vinton

Compared with other books in this list, Eat It Up! is very much aimed at zero-waste newbies. That said, it’s a comprehensive guide for young chefs looking to eat more sustainably, even if older, more experienced cooks might find many of its tips and techniques second nature. It makes a great gift for young adults moving away from home for the first time.

The No Food Waste Movement

About 1.3 billion tons of perfectly edible food is wasted each year. That’s roughly 250 lbs (113 kg) per person – enough to feed someone for up to two months. Cutting down on food waste is something we can all do to feed the world and benefit our environment.

Click here to learn more about what you can do to take part in this important movement and read what others are doing as well. You can even get started today by downloading one of these excellent food waste apps.


No-Waste and Leftovers Cookbooks: The Best Books to Reduce Food Waste

Hate seeing food go to waste? It’s one thing obsessing about those containers full of yesterday’s dinner and quite another working out how to avoid creating waste in the first place. These are five of the best zero-waste cookbooks, from repurposing leftovers to using every part of the animal or vegetable.

Now & Again: Go-To Recipes, Inspired Menus + Endless Ideas for Reinventing Leftovers by Julia Turshen

Chef, activist and occasional Gwyneth Paltrow collaborator, Julia Turshen, will completely revolutionise the way you think about cooking with this 2018 book. Yes, cooking with leftovers in mind is a huge part of it but, thankfully, the focus here is on entertaining first.

Turshen’s simple, seasonal and affordable recipes – from the 'No Stress Thanksgiving' dinner to mouthwatering salads and sides – all come with tips on preparing ahead of time, answering handy questions like what to serve the dish with and how to figure out exactly how much you need. The latter isn’t a perfect science, of course, so you’ll also find tips on how to repurpose any leftovers you do have.

Cooking With Scraps: Turn Your Peels, Cores, Rinds, and Stems into Delicious Meals by Lindsay-Jean Hard

Lindsay-Jean Hard writes the Cooking With Scraps column for Food52 and this book compiles 85 of her best zero-waste recipes.

As well as a few easy ideas on how to use broccoli stems and stale bread, Hard also shares intriguing recipes like carrot green pesto and vegan mayonnaise made from leftover bean water. Weird, but after trying a few you’ll wonder why you were ever throwing these things out in the first place.

Scraps, Peels, and Stems: Recipes and Tips for Rethinking Food Waste at Home by Jill Lightner

On the surface, Scraps, Peels, and Stems isn’t much different to Cooking With Scraps above. But if there’s one criticism of the latter, it’s that too many of the recipes require buying other ingredients to make them work. Jill Lightner’s book, on the other hand, is less strict with its recipes.

Instead, Scraps, Peels, and Stems offers inspiration for coming up with your own ideas. Sure, you can just follow the instructions if you’d prefer, but this is a great buy for confident homecooks who are eager to use their own creativity in experimenting with those parts of the animal or vegetable that often get thrown away.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook by Linda Ly

Linda Ly writes about farm-to-table cooking on her blog, Garden Betty. The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook was her first book, and it’s now back in a new revised edition.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook is, in Ly’s own words, an “indispensable book for home cooks with adventurous appetites”, and we’re inclined to agree. It’s a superb guide to all the parts of the vegetable you can and can’t eat. If your end goal is to grow more of your own food out in the garden, or even to become entirely self-sufficient, then this is the book for you.

Eat It Up! by Sherri Brooks Vinton

Compared with other books in this list, Eat It Up! is very much aimed at zero-waste newbies. That said, it’s a comprehensive guide for young chefs looking to eat more sustainably, even if older, more experienced cooks might find many of its tips and techniques second nature. It makes a great gift for young adults moving away from home for the first time.

The No Food Waste Movement

About 1.3 billion tons of perfectly edible food is wasted each year. That’s roughly 250 lbs (113 kg) per person – enough to feed someone for up to two months. Cutting down on food waste is something we can all do to feed the world and benefit our environment.

Click here to learn more about what you can do to take part in this important movement and read what others are doing as well. You can even get started today by downloading one of these excellent food waste apps.


No-Waste and Leftovers Cookbooks: The Best Books to Reduce Food Waste

Hate seeing food go to waste? It’s one thing obsessing about those containers full of yesterday’s dinner and quite another working out how to avoid creating waste in the first place. These are five of the best zero-waste cookbooks, from repurposing leftovers to using every part of the animal or vegetable.

Now & Again: Go-To Recipes, Inspired Menus + Endless Ideas for Reinventing Leftovers by Julia Turshen

Chef, activist and occasional Gwyneth Paltrow collaborator, Julia Turshen, will completely revolutionise the way you think about cooking with this 2018 book. Yes, cooking with leftovers in mind is a huge part of it but, thankfully, the focus here is on entertaining first.

Turshen’s simple, seasonal and affordable recipes – from the 'No Stress Thanksgiving' dinner to mouthwatering salads and sides – all come with tips on preparing ahead of time, answering handy questions like what to serve the dish with and how to figure out exactly how much you need. The latter isn’t a perfect science, of course, so you’ll also find tips on how to repurpose any leftovers you do have.

Cooking With Scraps: Turn Your Peels, Cores, Rinds, and Stems into Delicious Meals by Lindsay-Jean Hard

Lindsay-Jean Hard writes the Cooking With Scraps column for Food52 and this book compiles 85 of her best zero-waste recipes.

As well as a few easy ideas on how to use broccoli stems and stale bread, Hard also shares intriguing recipes like carrot green pesto and vegan mayonnaise made from leftover bean water. Weird, but after trying a few you’ll wonder why you were ever throwing these things out in the first place.

Scraps, Peels, and Stems: Recipes and Tips for Rethinking Food Waste at Home by Jill Lightner

On the surface, Scraps, Peels, and Stems isn’t much different to Cooking With Scraps above. But if there’s one criticism of the latter, it’s that too many of the recipes require buying other ingredients to make them work. Jill Lightner’s book, on the other hand, is less strict with its recipes.

Instead, Scraps, Peels, and Stems offers inspiration for coming up with your own ideas. Sure, you can just follow the instructions if you’d prefer, but this is a great buy for confident homecooks who are eager to use their own creativity in experimenting with those parts of the animal or vegetable that often get thrown away.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook by Linda Ly

Linda Ly writes about farm-to-table cooking on her blog, Garden Betty. The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook was her first book, and it’s now back in a new revised edition.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook is, in Ly’s own words, an “indispensable book for home cooks with adventurous appetites”, and we’re inclined to agree. It’s a superb guide to all the parts of the vegetable you can and can’t eat. If your end goal is to grow more of your own food out in the garden, or even to become entirely self-sufficient, then this is the book for you.

Eat It Up! by Sherri Brooks Vinton

Compared with other books in this list, Eat It Up! is very much aimed at zero-waste newbies. That said, it’s a comprehensive guide for young chefs looking to eat more sustainably, even if older, more experienced cooks might find many of its tips and techniques second nature. It makes a great gift for young adults moving away from home for the first time.

The No Food Waste Movement

About 1.3 billion tons of perfectly edible food is wasted each year. That’s roughly 250 lbs (113 kg) per person – enough to feed someone for up to two months. Cutting down on food waste is something we can all do to feed the world and benefit our environment.

Click here to learn more about what you can do to take part in this important movement and read what others are doing as well. You can even get started today by downloading one of these excellent food waste apps.


No-Waste and Leftovers Cookbooks: The Best Books to Reduce Food Waste

Hate seeing food go to waste? It’s one thing obsessing about those containers full of yesterday’s dinner and quite another working out how to avoid creating waste in the first place. These are five of the best zero-waste cookbooks, from repurposing leftovers to using every part of the animal or vegetable.

Now & Again: Go-To Recipes, Inspired Menus + Endless Ideas for Reinventing Leftovers by Julia Turshen

Chef, activist and occasional Gwyneth Paltrow collaborator, Julia Turshen, will completely revolutionise the way you think about cooking with this 2018 book. Yes, cooking with leftovers in mind is a huge part of it but, thankfully, the focus here is on entertaining first.

Turshen’s simple, seasonal and affordable recipes – from the 'No Stress Thanksgiving' dinner to mouthwatering salads and sides – all come with tips on preparing ahead of time, answering handy questions like what to serve the dish with and how to figure out exactly how much you need. The latter isn’t a perfect science, of course, so you’ll also find tips on how to repurpose any leftovers you do have.

Cooking With Scraps: Turn Your Peels, Cores, Rinds, and Stems into Delicious Meals by Lindsay-Jean Hard

Lindsay-Jean Hard writes the Cooking With Scraps column for Food52 and this book compiles 85 of her best zero-waste recipes.

As well as a few easy ideas on how to use broccoli stems and stale bread, Hard also shares intriguing recipes like carrot green pesto and vegan mayonnaise made from leftover bean water. Weird, but after trying a few you’ll wonder why you were ever throwing these things out in the first place.

Scraps, Peels, and Stems: Recipes and Tips for Rethinking Food Waste at Home by Jill Lightner

On the surface, Scraps, Peels, and Stems isn’t much different to Cooking With Scraps above. But if there’s one criticism of the latter, it’s that too many of the recipes require buying other ingredients to make them work. Jill Lightner’s book, on the other hand, is less strict with its recipes.

Instead, Scraps, Peels, and Stems offers inspiration for coming up with your own ideas. Sure, you can just follow the instructions if you’d prefer, but this is a great buy for confident homecooks who are eager to use their own creativity in experimenting with those parts of the animal or vegetable that often get thrown away.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook by Linda Ly

Linda Ly writes about farm-to-table cooking on her blog, Garden Betty. The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook was her first book, and it’s now back in a new revised edition.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook is, in Ly’s own words, an “indispensable book for home cooks with adventurous appetites”, and we’re inclined to agree. It’s a superb guide to all the parts of the vegetable you can and can’t eat. If your end goal is to grow more of your own food out in the garden, or even to become entirely self-sufficient, then this is the book for you.

Eat It Up! by Sherri Brooks Vinton

Compared with other books in this list, Eat It Up! is very much aimed at zero-waste newbies. That said, it’s a comprehensive guide for young chefs looking to eat more sustainably, even if older, more experienced cooks might find many of its tips and techniques second nature. It makes a great gift for young adults moving away from home for the first time.

The No Food Waste Movement

About 1.3 billion tons of perfectly edible food is wasted each year. That’s roughly 250 lbs (113 kg) per person – enough to feed someone for up to two months. Cutting down on food waste is something we can all do to feed the world and benefit our environment.

Click here to learn more about what you can do to take part in this important movement and read what others are doing as well. You can even get started today by downloading one of these excellent food waste apps.


No-Waste and Leftovers Cookbooks: The Best Books to Reduce Food Waste

Hate seeing food go to waste? It’s one thing obsessing about those containers full of yesterday’s dinner and quite another working out how to avoid creating waste in the first place. These are five of the best zero-waste cookbooks, from repurposing leftovers to using every part of the animal or vegetable.

Now & Again: Go-To Recipes, Inspired Menus + Endless Ideas for Reinventing Leftovers by Julia Turshen

Chef, activist and occasional Gwyneth Paltrow collaborator, Julia Turshen, will completely revolutionise the way you think about cooking with this 2018 book. Yes, cooking with leftovers in mind is a huge part of it but, thankfully, the focus here is on entertaining first.

Turshen’s simple, seasonal and affordable recipes – from the 'No Stress Thanksgiving' dinner to mouthwatering salads and sides – all come with tips on preparing ahead of time, answering handy questions like what to serve the dish with and how to figure out exactly how much you need. The latter isn’t a perfect science, of course, so you’ll also find tips on how to repurpose any leftovers you do have.

Cooking With Scraps: Turn Your Peels, Cores, Rinds, and Stems into Delicious Meals by Lindsay-Jean Hard

Lindsay-Jean Hard writes the Cooking With Scraps column for Food52 and this book compiles 85 of her best zero-waste recipes.

As well as a few easy ideas on how to use broccoli stems and stale bread, Hard also shares intriguing recipes like carrot green pesto and vegan mayonnaise made from leftover bean water. Weird, but after trying a few you’ll wonder why you were ever throwing these things out in the first place.

Scraps, Peels, and Stems: Recipes and Tips for Rethinking Food Waste at Home by Jill Lightner

On the surface, Scraps, Peels, and Stems isn’t much different to Cooking With Scraps above. But if there’s one criticism of the latter, it’s that too many of the recipes require buying other ingredients to make them work. Jill Lightner’s book, on the other hand, is less strict with its recipes.

Instead, Scraps, Peels, and Stems offers inspiration for coming up with your own ideas. Sure, you can just follow the instructions if you’d prefer, but this is a great buy for confident homecooks who are eager to use their own creativity in experimenting with those parts of the animal or vegetable that often get thrown away.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook by Linda Ly

Linda Ly writes about farm-to-table cooking on her blog, Garden Betty. The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook was her first book, and it’s now back in a new revised edition.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook is, in Ly’s own words, an “indispensable book for home cooks with adventurous appetites”, and we’re inclined to agree. It’s a superb guide to all the parts of the vegetable you can and can’t eat. If your end goal is to grow more of your own food out in the garden, or even to become entirely self-sufficient, then this is the book for you.

Eat It Up! by Sherri Brooks Vinton

Compared with other books in this list, Eat It Up! is very much aimed at zero-waste newbies. That said, it’s a comprehensive guide for young chefs looking to eat more sustainably, even if older, more experienced cooks might find many of its tips and techniques second nature. It makes a great gift for young adults moving away from home for the first time.

The No Food Waste Movement

About 1.3 billion tons of perfectly edible food is wasted each year. That’s roughly 250 lbs (113 kg) per person – enough to feed someone for up to two months. Cutting down on food waste is something we can all do to feed the world and benefit our environment.

Click here to learn more about what you can do to take part in this important movement and read what others are doing as well. You can even get started today by downloading one of these excellent food waste apps.


No-Waste and Leftovers Cookbooks: The Best Books to Reduce Food Waste

Hate seeing food go to waste? It’s one thing obsessing about those containers full of yesterday’s dinner and quite another working out how to avoid creating waste in the first place. These are five of the best zero-waste cookbooks, from repurposing leftovers to using every part of the animal or vegetable.

Now & Again: Go-To Recipes, Inspired Menus + Endless Ideas for Reinventing Leftovers by Julia Turshen

Chef, activist and occasional Gwyneth Paltrow collaborator, Julia Turshen, will completely revolutionise the way you think about cooking with this 2018 book. Yes, cooking with leftovers in mind is a huge part of it but, thankfully, the focus here is on entertaining first.

Turshen’s simple, seasonal and affordable recipes – from the 'No Stress Thanksgiving' dinner to mouthwatering salads and sides – all come with tips on preparing ahead of time, answering handy questions like what to serve the dish with and how to figure out exactly how much you need. The latter isn’t a perfect science, of course, so you’ll also find tips on how to repurpose any leftovers you do have.

Cooking With Scraps: Turn Your Peels, Cores, Rinds, and Stems into Delicious Meals by Lindsay-Jean Hard

Lindsay-Jean Hard writes the Cooking With Scraps column for Food52 and this book compiles 85 of her best zero-waste recipes.

As well as a few easy ideas on how to use broccoli stems and stale bread, Hard also shares intriguing recipes like carrot green pesto and vegan mayonnaise made from leftover bean water. Weird, but after trying a few you’ll wonder why you were ever throwing these things out in the first place.

Scraps, Peels, and Stems: Recipes and Tips for Rethinking Food Waste at Home by Jill Lightner

On the surface, Scraps, Peels, and Stems isn’t much different to Cooking With Scraps above. But if there’s one criticism of the latter, it’s that too many of the recipes require buying other ingredients to make them work. Jill Lightner’s book, on the other hand, is less strict with its recipes.

Instead, Scraps, Peels, and Stems offers inspiration for coming up with your own ideas. Sure, you can just follow the instructions if you’d prefer, but this is a great buy for confident homecooks who are eager to use their own creativity in experimenting with those parts of the animal or vegetable that often get thrown away.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook by Linda Ly

Linda Ly writes about farm-to-table cooking on her blog, Garden Betty. The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook was her first book, and it’s now back in a new revised edition.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook is, in Ly’s own words, an “indispensable book for home cooks with adventurous appetites”, and we’re inclined to agree. It’s a superb guide to all the parts of the vegetable you can and can’t eat. If your end goal is to grow more of your own food out in the garden, or even to become entirely self-sufficient, then this is the book for you.

Eat It Up! by Sherri Brooks Vinton

Compared with other books in this list, Eat It Up! is very much aimed at zero-waste newbies. That said, it’s a comprehensive guide for young chefs looking to eat more sustainably, even if older, more experienced cooks might find many of its tips and techniques second nature. It makes a great gift for young adults moving away from home for the first time.

The No Food Waste Movement

About 1.3 billion tons of perfectly edible food is wasted each year. That’s roughly 250 lbs (113 kg) per person – enough to feed someone for up to two months. Cutting down on food waste is something we can all do to feed the world and benefit our environment.

Click here to learn more about what you can do to take part in this important movement and read what others are doing as well. You can even get started today by downloading one of these excellent food waste apps.


No-Waste and Leftovers Cookbooks: The Best Books to Reduce Food Waste

Hate seeing food go to waste? It’s one thing obsessing about those containers full of yesterday’s dinner and quite another working out how to avoid creating waste in the first place. These are five of the best zero-waste cookbooks, from repurposing leftovers to using every part of the animal or vegetable.

Now & Again: Go-To Recipes, Inspired Menus + Endless Ideas for Reinventing Leftovers by Julia Turshen

Chef, activist and occasional Gwyneth Paltrow collaborator, Julia Turshen, will completely revolutionise the way you think about cooking with this 2018 book. Yes, cooking with leftovers in mind is a huge part of it but, thankfully, the focus here is on entertaining first.

Turshen’s simple, seasonal and affordable recipes – from the 'No Stress Thanksgiving' dinner to mouthwatering salads and sides – all come with tips on preparing ahead of time, answering handy questions like what to serve the dish with and how to figure out exactly how much you need. The latter isn’t a perfect science, of course, so you’ll also find tips on how to repurpose any leftovers you do have.

Cooking With Scraps: Turn Your Peels, Cores, Rinds, and Stems into Delicious Meals by Lindsay-Jean Hard

Lindsay-Jean Hard writes the Cooking With Scraps column for Food52 and this book compiles 85 of her best zero-waste recipes.

As well as a few easy ideas on how to use broccoli stems and stale bread, Hard also shares intriguing recipes like carrot green pesto and vegan mayonnaise made from leftover bean water. Weird, but after trying a few you’ll wonder why you were ever throwing these things out in the first place.

Scraps, Peels, and Stems: Recipes and Tips for Rethinking Food Waste at Home by Jill Lightner

On the surface, Scraps, Peels, and Stems isn’t much different to Cooking With Scraps above. But if there’s one criticism of the latter, it’s that too many of the recipes require buying other ingredients to make them work. Jill Lightner’s book, on the other hand, is less strict with its recipes.

Instead, Scraps, Peels, and Stems offers inspiration for coming up with your own ideas. Sure, you can just follow the instructions if you’d prefer, but this is a great buy for confident homecooks who are eager to use their own creativity in experimenting with those parts of the animal or vegetable that often get thrown away.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook by Linda Ly

Linda Ly writes about farm-to-table cooking on her blog, Garden Betty. The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook was her first book, and it’s now back in a new revised edition.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook is, in Ly’s own words, an “indispensable book for home cooks with adventurous appetites”, and we’re inclined to agree. It’s a superb guide to all the parts of the vegetable you can and can’t eat. If your end goal is to grow more of your own food out in the garden, or even to become entirely self-sufficient, then this is the book for you.

Eat It Up! by Sherri Brooks Vinton

Compared with other books in this list, Eat It Up! is very much aimed at zero-waste newbies. That said, it’s a comprehensive guide for young chefs looking to eat more sustainably, even if older, more experienced cooks might find many of its tips and techniques second nature. It makes a great gift for young adults moving away from home for the first time.

The No Food Waste Movement

About 1.3 billion tons of perfectly edible food is wasted each year. That’s roughly 250 lbs (113 kg) per person – enough to feed someone for up to two months. Cutting down on food waste is something we can all do to feed the world and benefit our environment.

Click here to learn more about what you can do to take part in this important movement and read what others are doing as well. You can even get started today by downloading one of these excellent food waste apps.


No-Waste and Leftovers Cookbooks: The Best Books to Reduce Food Waste

Hate seeing food go to waste? It’s one thing obsessing about those containers full of yesterday’s dinner and quite another working out how to avoid creating waste in the first place. These are five of the best zero-waste cookbooks, from repurposing leftovers to using every part of the animal or vegetable.

Now & Again: Go-To Recipes, Inspired Menus + Endless Ideas for Reinventing Leftovers by Julia Turshen

Chef, activist and occasional Gwyneth Paltrow collaborator, Julia Turshen, will completely revolutionise the way you think about cooking with this 2018 book. Yes, cooking with leftovers in mind is a huge part of it but, thankfully, the focus here is on entertaining first.

Turshen’s simple, seasonal and affordable recipes – from the 'No Stress Thanksgiving' dinner to mouthwatering salads and sides – all come with tips on preparing ahead of time, answering handy questions like what to serve the dish with and how to figure out exactly how much you need. The latter isn’t a perfect science, of course, so you’ll also find tips on how to repurpose any leftovers you do have.

Cooking With Scraps: Turn Your Peels, Cores, Rinds, and Stems into Delicious Meals by Lindsay-Jean Hard

Lindsay-Jean Hard writes the Cooking With Scraps column for Food52 and this book compiles 85 of her best zero-waste recipes.

As well as a few easy ideas on how to use broccoli stems and stale bread, Hard also shares intriguing recipes like carrot green pesto and vegan mayonnaise made from leftover bean water. Weird, but after trying a few you’ll wonder why you were ever throwing these things out in the first place.

Scraps, Peels, and Stems: Recipes and Tips for Rethinking Food Waste at Home by Jill Lightner

On the surface, Scraps, Peels, and Stems isn’t much different to Cooking With Scraps above. But if there’s one criticism of the latter, it’s that too many of the recipes require buying other ingredients to make them work. Jill Lightner’s book, on the other hand, is less strict with its recipes.

Instead, Scraps, Peels, and Stems offers inspiration for coming up with your own ideas. Sure, you can just follow the instructions if you’d prefer, but this is a great buy for confident homecooks who are eager to use their own creativity in experimenting with those parts of the animal or vegetable that often get thrown away.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook by Linda Ly

Linda Ly writes about farm-to-table cooking on her blog, Garden Betty. The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook was her first book, and it’s now back in a new revised edition.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook is, in Ly’s own words, an “indispensable book for home cooks with adventurous appetites”, and we’re inclined to agree. It’s a superb guide to all the parts of the vegetable you can and can’t eat. If your end goal is to grow more of your own food out in the garden, or even to become entirely self-sufficient, then this is the book for you.

Eat It Up! by Sherri Brooks Vinton

Compared with other books in this list, Eat It Up! is very much aimed at zero-waste newbies. That said, it’s a comprehensive guide for young chefs looking to eat more sustainably, even if older, more experienced cooks might find many of its tips and techniques second nature. It makes a great gift for young adults moving away from home for the first time.

The No Food Waste Movement

About 1.3 billion tons of perfectly edible food is wasted each year. That’s roughly 250 lbs (113 kg) per person – enough to feed someone for up to two months. Cutting down on food waste is something we can all do to feed the world and benefit our environment.

Click here to learn more about what you can do to take part in this important movement and read what others are doing as well. You can even get started today by downloading one of these excellent food waste apps.


No-Waste and Leftovers Cookbooks: The Best Books to Reduce Food Waste

Hate seeing food go to waste? It’s one thing obsessing about those containers full of yesterday’s dinner and quite another working out how to avoid creating waste in the first place. These are five of the best zero-waste cookbooks, from repurposing leftovers to using every part of the animal or vegetable.

Now & Again: Go-To Recipes, Inspired Menus + Endless Ideas for Reinventing Leftovers by Julia Turshen

Chef, activist and occasional Gwyneth Paltrow collaborator, Julia Turshen, will completely revolutionise the way you think about cooking with this 2018 book. Yes, cooking with leftovers in mind is a huge part of it but, thankfully, the focus here is on entertaining first.

Turshen’s simple, seasonal and affordable recipes – from the 'No Stress Thanksgiving' dinner to mouthwatering salads and sides – all come with tips on preparing ahead of time, answering handy questions like what to serve the dish with and how to figure out exactly how much you need. The latter isn’t a perfect science, of course, so you’ll also find tips on how to repurpose any leftovers you do have.

Cooking With Scraps: Turn Your Peels, Cores, Rinds, and Stems into Delicious Meals by Lindsay-Jean Hard

Lindsay-Jean Hard writes the Cooking With Scraps column for Food52 and this book compiles 85 of her best zero-waste recipes.

As well as a few easy ideas on how to use broccoli stems and stale bread, Hard also shares intriguing recipes like carrot green pesto and vegan mayonnaise made from leftover bean water. Weird, but after trying a few you’ll wonder why you were ever throwing these things out in the first place.

Scraps, Peels, and Stems: Recipes and Tips for Rethinking Food Waste at Home by Jill Lightner

On the surface, Scraps, Peels, and Stems isn’t much different to Cooking With Scraps above. But if there’s one criticism of the latter, it’s that too many of the recipes require buying other ingredients to make them work. Jill Lightner’s book, on the other hand, is less strict with its recipes.

Instead, Scraps, Peels, and Stems offers inspiration for coming up with your own ideas. Sure, you can just follow the instructions if you’d prefer, but this is a great buy for confident homecooks who are eager to use their own creativity in experimenting with those parts of the animal or vegetable that often get thrown away.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook by Linda Ly

Linda Ly writes about farm-to-table cooking on her blog, Garden Betty. The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook was her first book, and it’s now back in a new revised edition.

The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook is, in Ly’s own words, an “indispensable book for home cooks with adventurous appetites”, and we’re inclined to agree. It’s a superb guide to all the parts of the vegetable you can and can’t eat. If your end goal is to grow more of your own food out in the garden, or even to become entirely self-sufficient, then this is the book for you.

Eat It Up! by Sherri Brooks Vinton

Compared with other books in this list, Eat It Up! is very much aimed at zero-waste newbies. That said, it’s a comprehensive guide for young chefs looking to eat more sustainably, even if older, more experienced cooks might find many of its tips and techniques second nature. It makes a great gift for young adults moving away from home for the first time.

The No Food Waste Movement

About 1.3 billion tons of perfectly edible food is wasted each year. That’s roughly 250 lbs (113 kg) per person – enough to feed someone for up to two months. Cutting down on food waste is something we can all do to feed the world and benefit our environment.

Click here to learn more about what you can do to take part in this important movement and read what others are doing as well. You can even get started today by downloading one of these excellent food waste apps.


Watch the video: Erntedankfest - Ist deine Ernte Gott wohlgefällig? (May 2022).